Stone Cold Lampin’ #12

Stone Cold Lampin’ #12
9/19/15

Started out on a jazz trip, into a mix of international sounds from Japan, Mali, and South America. Western classical music rears its pretty head, Agnes Martin On Not Thinking, wrapping up strangely.

Hour 1: Starts at 1:55 so you get a few minutes of Goodwrench. Then it’s a Jazz trip for the first hour.

Hour 2: Jazz rolls on for twenty odd minutes, then Acid Mothers Temple guitarist Makoto Kawabata, then Tibetan exorcist chant.

Hour 3: Blues-pop from Mali. South American guitar instruments, blues, gospel, Schubert played by Peter Serkin.

Hour 4: Satie played slowly by Philip Corner, Agnes Martin speaks, Robert Crouch, Sibelius

Here’s the playlist.

Each mp3 is 70 minutes long and starts a few minutes before the hour, and ends a few minutes after.
Streams will be available until October 2.

Streams via kfjc.org.

Stone Cold Lampin #11

Stone Cold Lampin’ #11
9/12/15

Starting out digging in the reggae library, the show takes a left turn at the new William Parker CD, spends some time with Hector Villalobos and Henry Brant, ending up with some international vocal music and long-form Robert Crouch.

Hour 1: Starts at 1:55 so you get a few minutes of Goodwrench. Then it’s a reggae vibe for forty minutes

Hour 2: Villalobos, Wet Hair, Kyoto Nohgaku Kai.

Hour 3: Villalobos, Henry Brant.

Hour 4: Jazz, international vocal, ambient.

Each mp3 is 70 minutes long and starts a few minutes before the hour, and ends a few minutes after.
Streams will be available until September 26.

Streams via kfjc.org.

Japanese Noh Music

Japanese Noh Music

Lyrichord LST 7137
by Hemroid The Leader

In the 6th century, ancient music and dance came to Japan from the Kingdom of Kudara in what is now Korea.  In the 8th century the Chinese circus came to Japan, with acrobatics, pantomime, and comedy.  These influences, in combination with indigenous rituals related to the passing of the seasons or cultivation of rice, form the basis for Noh theater, which took on its present form in the 14th century.

Noh theater troupes are led by a Grand Master and all members are blood relatives or adopted.  Sons reprise roles of their fathers.  Small gestures are mimicked through generations, eventually commanding much of the audience’s focus.  The audience is made up of the Shogun, feudal lords, sophisticates and wealthy commoners.

This record features members of the Kyoto Noh Theater, designated as an Important Intangible Cultural Property by the Japanese government in 1957.   It may seem like not much is going on.   A wooden flute plays an ancient pentatonic melody, taiko strike here and there, a woodblock plays a slow roll as characters enter and exit the scene, dancers move in exact synchronization.  The main character wears a wooden face mask, an ornate robe, and speaks in Old Japanese.  A ceremonial tone pervades throughout.

Of Viff and Other Words That Have Gone the Way of the Dodo Bird

I wrote about Viff in the post about the aquarium.  I was too late on that one, too.  By the time we drove home from the aquarium, he was already saying Fish correctly.

John John pointed to my shoulder recently, and said definitively, “Butt.”  I looked at my shirt; he was pointing to some decorative buttons.  “Button,” I said.  “Can you say, ‘button?'”

“Butt,” he told me.

I kept meaning to make a little post about this because I thought it was cute.  There have been many moments of this, pointing to his pants button, and announcing, “Butt.” Or my collared shirt: “Butt.”

Today, he said, “Button,” and I knew my chance of posting in the moment had slipped by.  But while the iron is still hot, I wish to strike two more times: mokosyll & keemah.

It’s great that he is developing, but I’ll be just a little sad when he finally says motorcycle and cucumber.

Stone Cold Lampin #10

Stone Cold Lampin’ #10
9/5/15

Starting out percussive and textural, the show gets more centered towards out jazz as it goes on.

Hour 1: Starts at 1:55 so you get a few minutes of Goodwrench. Ritual drumming, Haitian Vodou, minimalism.

Hour 2: Biff Rose, Brahms, contemporary jazz.

Hour 3: 70s jazz, out jazz, extended technique sounds, Oranges.

Hour 4: Uruguayan organ, vocal jazz, French, Brooklyn saxophone, Middle Eastern, Somniloquy.

Each mp3 is 70 minutes long and starts a few minutes before the hour, and ends a few minutes after.
Streams will be available until September 19.

Streams via kfjc.org.